West Bend Vegetation Project: Successful Collaboration

Here’s a map: Based on this story in the Oregonian, this effort seems to be a success, with no litigation. I wonder what lessons could be learned from this? What went right? In 2009, Congress authorized the Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Fund, providing $40 million annually through 2019 to restore national forests. Forest Service officials …

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Arbitration in Barasso’s Bill: What Do You Think?

It seems like this is one of the few new ideas to surface on this recently. On this blog, I have previously suggested publicly documented mediation be used, but I am not as familiar with arbitration. I’d like to hear what others think who have experience with those processes. Also, does anyone know about the …

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Limerick on Political Correctness and Polite Directness

Frequent readers know I am a fan of Professor Patty Limerick at University of Colorado and Director of the Center of the American West who has been doing the “Frackingsense” series on oil and gas development. Rebecca Watson’s presentation is tomorrow. All the podcasts can be found here. But the reason I brought up Professor …

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Upping Our Discussion Game: Some Encouragement

Whew, I just got done with another quarter of school, which involved reading books and online discussion (and developing an early stage of a thesis proposal). One thing I learned this quarter is that people can be civil even when discussing the most difficult and passionate views (e.g. Zionism and the policies of Israel). I …

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The California Drought and Climate Change: Revkin and Hoerling

I think Revkin and Hoerling deserve a shout-out for this piece in terms of explaining how the IPCC reached their conclusion. Revkin quoted from a note from Martin Hoerling, a NOAA scientist, so I guess Dr. Hoerling has a gift for explaining things at what I consider the right level of detail (I know this …

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The World’s Most Advanced Building Material Is… Wood

Thought folks might be interested in this piece from Popular Science here. Why the sudden interest in wood? Compared with steel or concrete, CLT, also known as mass timber, is cheaper, easier to assemble, and more fire resistant, thanks to the way wood chars. It’s also more sustainable. Wood is renewable like any crop, and …

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Adopt-a-Project Opportunity: Blankenship Veg Project

UPDATE: One of our generous readers offered a copy of the complaint here. Based on this coverage in the Great Falls Independent paper, I am curious how the FS should have surveyed according to Garrity, and what they actually did. “First, this case is about the Forest Service’s failure to use ‘best available science’ and …

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Amazingly Different Coverage of Wildfire Funding: Denver Post

Now, in the previous post here I was critical of what I thought was the Administration’s focus on climate change as the source of wildfires.. only to find out that perhaps it was the New York Times’ spin and not entirely the Administration at all! So let’s compare coverage in the Denver Post and the …

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