Precautionary Principle: Applications to Forest Management?

The term “precautionary principle” has been kicked around a little here, but here’s another perspective. First, DellaSala’s quote that “With the precautionary principle, the agency has the burden of proof to demonstrate it’s not harmful” is not at all being “sloppy about science”, it’s exactly consistent with how the term is used in legal and …

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Springtime, and a young man’s thoughts turn to…

…rust spores, of course. Endocronartium harknessii. Here’s my new grad student (from Haiti) out learning a little forest pathology, and collecting some samples for my course next fall. Western gall rust, scourge of the lodgepole pine (and sometimes ponderosa). The urediniospores are out now and flying around by the billions, these are some small scruffy …

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The Future of Forests and Forest Management: Change, Uncertainty, and Adaptation

If anyone’s interested and in the area, I’ll spam this meeting that’s taking place next week in Missoula, at the Annual Meeting of the Northwest Scientific Association. It starts Wednesday and there are topics besides those shown below, but these seem most relevant to folks here (whereas my presentations on fungi and nematodes may be …

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MPB, “cut-and-chunk”, and the misapplication of forest science

Sometimes, things are just stranger than anything you could make up. I think someone else may have posted some of this, but I can’t find it so my apologies to those who’ve seen it before. From South Dakota’s Capital Journal article, “Study: Large percentages of healthy trees cut in effort to fight mountain pine beetle”, …

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Something a little different: forestry in Haiti

Well first a disclaimer, I’m using the term “forest” somewhat loosely, many Haitian trees are associated with food as much as with timber, e.g. coconut palm, mango, banana/plantain, coffee, and also timber species + food species + agronomic crops often found growing all together. Grand’Anse Department is the most (relatively) unspoiled part of Haiti, i.e. …

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Something different: White-nose syndrome of bats, and national forests

This hasn’t gotten huge attention in the West yet, but it will if and when (probably the latter) this wildlife disease arrives out here.  In the eastern U.S., this contagious fungal disease (first observed only a few years ago in New York and Vermont) has devastated several species of bats and obliterated some huge hibernating …

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